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PBK Visiting Scholar Stacey Sinclair, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University, will visit Tulane University on January 23-24, 2020.  Professor Sinclair will deliver the lecture "Why Diversity? Framing Diversity as an Instrumental or Moral Good" on Thursday, January 23, 2020 at 6:00 PM.  The lecture is free and open to the public.  For more information, contact Brian Brox at pbk@tulane.edu

Immerse yourself in N̶O̶T̶ Supposed 2-BE Here, Newcomb's current exhibition featuring the incredible work of Brandan "BMike" Odums while enjoying an engaging discussion led by Melissa A. Weber. Weber, curator with Tulane University Special Collections, will lead a conversation with Mia X, "The Mama of The Southern Gangsta Music," on hip hop and New Orleans music, exploring why certain stories get to be included in those histories and why some stories get overlooked. . Presented in conjunction with N̶O̶T̶ Supposed 2-BE Here. This event is free and open to the public.  

The second annual Tulane Brain Institute Distinguished Lecture will take place on Wednesday, January 15. "Aging, Memory, and the Brain" features Dr. Carol Barnes, a world leader in the study of how the brain changes during normal aging and the associated impacts for memory. Dr. Barnes is Regents Professor, Evelyn F. McKnight Chair for Learning and Memory in Aging, and Director of the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Arizona. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and past-president of the Society for Neuroscience. All are welcome to attend.

Format: 1-2 clinical cases of Fever in Honduras will be presented, with an emphasis on dengue. If presented in Spanish, we will have someone up here translate. Local findings by entomologists/epidemiologists/research virologists would also be presented. Audience: virologists, immunologists, epidemiologists, entomologists, clinicians (adult and pediatric), (ALL welcome) Content and Dynamics: -------- Arboviral infections, such as dengue virus, Zika virus, chikungunya virus, are an increasing clinical concern worldwide. Dengue infections have increased dramatically over the last 50 years.

Director, Robert and Arlene Kogod Center on Aging

Noaber Foundation Professor of Aging

Content and Dynamics: -------- Arboviral infections, such as dengue virus, Zika virus, chikungunya virus, are an increasing clinical concern worldwide. Dengue infections have increased dramatically over the last 50 years. There is no specific treatment for arboviral infections, and no safe, effective vaccine for dengue or Zika. Fever due to arboviral infection such as dengue and Zika is a relatively common occurrence in Honduras, compared to the United States. Physicians and epidemiologists in Honduras are gaining clinical expertise in diagnosis and management of arboviral infections.

Refugee Crises Now: 

A closer look at the Americas, Syria, and the Rohingya 

Jana Mason, UNHCR 

Tuesday, November 19th 

4pm

Diboll Gallery Newcomb Institute

Jim Krane is the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for Energy Studies at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy.

He holds a PhD degree from Cambridge University and is the author of “City of Gold: Dubai and the Dream of Capitalism (2009)”.

A former journalist, he was a correspondent for the Associated Press and has written for publications including the Washington Post, the Wall St. Journal and the Financial Times.

Wessex Kidney Centre, Portsmouth Hospitals Research and Development, University Hospital Southampton

 

 

This activity has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credits ™. http://bit.ly/CCERegistration

 

Lunch will be provided

The next installment of the  "Refugee Speakers’ Series"  will feature Dr. Sarah Cramsey from Tulane’s Jewish Studies Department.  Professor Cramsey will present a talk entitled “The Other Diaspora: Family Creation and the Migrations of Polish Jews” on Tuesday, November 5 at 3pm in the Great Room at the Alumni House.

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