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The Tulane Department of Classical Studies presents the Dennis A Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture with Catherine Morgan (All Sould College, University of Oxford) on Tuesday, March 31, 2020 at 6PM.

The Department of Classical Studies presents a lecture by Elizabeth Bartman (Independent Scholar) on Monday, November 11, 2019 at 5PM.

The Department of Classical Studies presents a lecture by Donna Zuckerberg (Eidolon) on Wednesday, October 16, 2019 at 5PM.

All is Fair in Love and War… But What About Family Business?

Journalism, criminal justice reform and social media intersect at this year’s Phelps Lecture on First Amendment Law with leading legal journalist and Yale Law School lecturer Emily Bazelon.

Tulane University Translational Science Grand Rounds: The Death of Evidence

Presented by: Jonathan Samet, MD, MS (Dean and Professor, Colorado School of Public Health)

Monday, April 29, 2019 at 12:00 PM

Tidewater Room 1210

Lunch will be served at 11:30 AM

Tulane University Translational Science Grand Rounds: Updates from the CKD Prognosis Consortium

Presented by: Morgan Grams, MD, MHS, PhD (Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University)

Thursday, April 25, 2019 at 12:00 PM

Tidewater Room 1210

Lunch will be served at 11:45 AM

Meg Stalcup is a visual and media anthropologist, and Assistant Professor in the School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies at the University of Ottawa. Her research and teaching explore the intersections of technology and data with politics, security, science, and ethics, drawing on long-term fieldwork in Brazil, the United States, and Canada. She is also director of the Collaboratoire d’Anthropologie Multimédia/ Multimedia Anthropology Collaboratory (CAM/MAC), a forum for explorations of digital technology, research, and pedagogy. 

The Tulane Classics Club and Anthropology Club present "Ovid's Niobe in Her Place," a lecture by Ellen Oliensis (University to California, Berkeley).

Friday, April 26, 2019 at 3PM in Jones Hall 204

Reception to follow in Jones 210

https://liberalarts.tulane.edu/departments/classical-studies/events

Orientalist tropes were a dominant feature of European cinema in the 1920s. This talk explores the types of film that influenced Henri Matisse’s paintings of Odalisques produced during this period and shows how popular cinematic culture set the stage for an exploration of gender, identity, and exoticism in painting. Challenging familiar interpretations of Matisse’s depictions of women in Orientalist costume, this talk examines the theme of female agency in the works against the background of tourism, fashion, and colonialism.

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